Teaching

SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY

Introduction to Literary Criticism and Theory (Fall 2016)
This class reads seminal works of twentieth-century literary criticism and theory from different movements– including the New Criticism, structuralism, and poststructuralism as well as psychoanalytic, Marxist, feminist, multicultural, and queer theory– in order to provide students with a foundation for understanding how literature is discussed in scholarly and critical discourse.

Book History (Spring 2016)
This graduate seminar examines seminal writings from the scholarship in The History of the Book. Syllabus is here: Eng604b_Book History 

The 21st-Century Experimental Novel (Fall 2015, Fall 2016)
This course reads novels published in the new millennium whose pages expose the influence of new media technologies. We examine these works in order to analyze what they have to say about globalism, the role of the literary, the experience of living in an age of information overload, and other topics at the center of our contemporary digital culture. Syllabus is here: Eng527.The 21st-C novel

The Book in the Digital Age (Fall 2015)
This class takes the topic of the book in the digital age as an opportunity to consider the book as a medium and symbol– a technology perfected over a thousand years and a powerful cultural symbol. Part critical theory, part History of the Book, this class gives students a historical perspective on contemporary debates about reading, knowledge, and literature. Syllabus is here: Eng563_The Book in the Digital Age

Digital Literature (Spring 2015, Spring 2016)
What happens to literature and its study when text moves from page to screen? This course examines works of digital literature (literature created on the computer to be read on the computer) to understand how this emergent literary form affects the way we read, study, and understand literature. Syllabus is HERE: Fall– Syllabus_Eng563_final
Spring– Eng527_Digital Literature Syllabus

Critical Digital Literacy (Spring and Fall, 2014)
What does it mean to be “literate” in the age of digital data, screens, and hyperattention? What does “reading and writing” describe in the age of Twitter, Facebook, and mobile digital narratives? What, if any, kinds of contemporary communication practices are uniquely “digital”?  And, the big one: How do digital technologies and the Internet affect the way we read, write, and think? In order to address these questions—indeed, in order to think critically about our digital culture– we need to know our media history. This class pursues digital literacy as a concept and a practice, a topic and a skill-set.  Students will learn to think critically and creatively about cultural, communicative, and cognitive consequences of the digital shift. Together, we will explore, analyze, and historicize the complicated sets of literacies that the digital both promotes and demands. Syllabus is here: Critical Digital Literacy Syllabus_Fall 2014

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO

2014,  2013: Lecturer for Sixth College’s CAT (Culture, Art, and Technology) Program, CAT 2: “The Book in the Digital Age”
This class pursues an understanding of the book medium, past and present, across a wide range of genres and medial formats: media studies criticism, fiction, bookwork sculpture, digital literature, archives, youtube animations, and more.  Learning to analyze the book, we learn to also think critically about other, newer reading technologies (e-readers, computers, cell phones, etc.) and the reading practices they enable.  Our goal is to better understand our contemporary digital age and the complicated rhetoric through which it operates.

YALE UNIVERSITY, Assistant Professor of English

**Recipient of the Sarai Ribicoff Teaching Award for Teaching Excellence in Yale College** 2010. This prize is awarded annually to a member of the Yale College faculty in the humanities “whose instruction and character reflect the qualities of independence, innovation, and originality.”

2011-2012 Research sabbatical, Morse Junior Fellowship Recipient

New Media Theory
This lecture course serves as an introduction to the critical study of digital media and culture. Situating new media in technical and cultural histories that precede and inform our contemporary engagement, we recognize new media as a topic with a history that deserves to be theorized. Specifically, we approach new media through paradigms provided by literary and cultural criticism. The course provides a foundation for digital culture and media studies more generally by close reading their central texts and discursive acts.

Digital Literature (Fall 2010) and (Fall 2008)
What happens to literature and its study when text moves from page to screen? This course examines works of digital literature (literature created on the computer to be read on the computer) to understand how this emergent literary form affects the way we read, study, and understand literature.

Readings in American Literature
An introduction to major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Readings include: Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick, Ezra Pound, Jean Toomer’s Cane, Tony Kushner’s Angels in America, and other texts.

Medieval Manuscripts to New Media: Studies in the History of the Book
Co-taught with Professor Jessica Brantley
The course approached the book as a reading technology that shapes literary study by focusing on issues raised at the intersection of medieval manuscript culture and contemporary digital culture. In particular, what do we mean when we speak of “an author,” “reading,” and “the book”? This course was a collaboration between English faculty, Yale’s ITG (Instruction Technology Group) and the Yale Libraries. It met in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and students were given more recent reading machines, Amazon Kindles, for the term. Midterm and final projects were web-based and were displayed in Sterling Memorial Library. Selected student projects are available here. The class made the frontpage of Yale College website on January 25, 2010 and received coverage in the Yale Daily News on February 2, 2010

Writing Seminar, Topic “New Media”
A composition course structured around the claim that digital technologies are not only tools that we use to access information; they also shape our interactions with content, how we read, write, and think.

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES
Lecturer in the English Department, 2007-2008

Technotexts and Technoculture (Lecture course, Eng 178, Spring 2008)
This course examines how new media technologies affect literature and reading practices. The first half of the quarter is dedicated to exploring how new media technotexts and their influence on the culture of reading; the second half examines how contemporary print novels respond to the threat and/or inspiration of new media in the reading technology of the bound book.

The 21st Century Novel (Seminar, Eng 180, Spring 2008)
This seminar reads print novels published in the new millennium whose pages expose the influence of new media technologies. We examine these works and their shared interest in and engagement with new media in order to analyze what they have to say about globalism, the role of the literary, the experience of living in a culture of terror, and other topics at the center of our contemporary digital culture.

Remix: Literature and Media (Lecture course, Eng 109, Winter 2008)
Media critic Lev Manovich calls ours a “remix culture” and the DJ as the exemplary artist of our time. How do we understand the concept of “remix” and reconcile it with the study of literature, an art form traditionally aligned with originality of authorship and intimacy between reader and text? What is literature in the age of remix? We read a variety of print and digital literature as well as cultural criticism to explore remix as a cultural concept, aesthetic practice, and political maneuver currently shaping our culture and its literature.

BROWN UNIVERSITY
Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Modern Culture and Media
, Spring 2007

Media Archaeology: Info, Discourse, Networks
This course examined the historical emergence of “media” and “media studies” as a methodology of cultural discourse through the theoretical concepts of “information,” “discourse” and “networks.” We pursued media archeology from the standpoint of contemporary new media and culture, tracing not only the medial and material origins of actual technologies but also the theoretical paradigms through which emerge these media forms and our engagement with them.

UCLA, Instructor
**Departmental Nominee for the Distinguished TA Award, a campus-wide UCLA award, 2003-2004 school year
*Departmental Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching, Dec. 2004

War, Literature, and its Representation
Eng 4W: Introduction to Critical Reading and Writing, UCLA (Spring 2006)
*Selection of students’ web-based essays available here

Digital Literature
Eng 88: Special Topics Seminar (Winter 2005)
*Selection of students’ web-based essays available here

Literature and Technology
Eng 4W: Critical Reading and Writing, UCLA (Fall 2005)

L(oo)king AT L[it]er@ture
Eng 4W: Critical Reading and Writing, UCLA (Winter 2004, Fall 2003)

Literary Equations: Approaching Literature Through Science
Eng 4W: Critical Reading and Writing, UCLA (Summer 2003)